A History of the New York Knickerbockers Baseball Club.

July 12th, 2013 by admin

Abner Doubleday’s name will always be associated with America’s favorite pastime, DIRECT TV, yet the idea that he invented baseball is becoming more of a myth than anything else. Debunking the myth required a little research into the Mills Commission and its chairman, Abraham G Mills. In 1905 a group of his colleagues appointed Mills to find out who invented the game; during that same period, a 71 year-old man by the name of Abner Graves published an article entitled, Abner Doubleday Invented Base Ball. The article gained national attention, yet the Mills Commission never investigated the story’s validity as it quickly became fact, rather than artistically licensed propaganda.Get more information here. http://thebaseballattic.wordpress.com/2013/03/07/the-doubleday-myth/ Perhaps displaying a sense of patriotism, Mills concluded that Doubleday invented the game as an original American creation, primarily based on the accountings and recollections of Abner Graves. In 1907 Mills made it official as the speculation surrounded the claim. Doubleday passed away in 1893, meaning that this posthumous title had no way of being validated from the original honoree. Abner Doubleday never claimed to be the inventor of baseball in any of his writings, yet there are indications that he expounded upon the specifications entailed in the British game of rounders.

What Sports Influenced The Origin And Evolution Of Baseball?

May 7th, 2013 by admin

It is generally accepted these days that, contrary to legend, Abner Doubleday did not invent the game of baseball. The question remains, though, who did? Like many other sports, baseball’s origins derive not from any one individual or game, but from the influence of many over the years.
There have been a countless number of games over the centuries that involved a ball being hit with a stick or bat. The two English-based sports most commonly linked to baseball are cricket and rounders.
Cricket’s historical roots date back to the late 1600s. The rules are complicated, but Read the rest of this entry »

What Was The First Organized Baseball Team?

May 3rd, 2013 by admin

In 1857, sixteen New York area baseball clubs formed the first officially recognized league, the NABBP, or National Association of Base Ball Players. The organization established standard rules and even held a championship, but the participants were strictly amateurs. The very first professional touring team, the Cincinnati Red Stockings, were founded in 1869 and consisted of ten players who were paid a salary. Managed by Harry Wright, the Red Stockings captured the nation’s imagination with their advanced style of play, drawing capacity crowds both in Cincinnati Read the rest of this entry »

How Alexander Cartwright Influenced The Evolution Of Baseball?

May 1st, 2013 by admin

Scratch Abner Doubleday from the lineup of men who influenced baseball, and replace him with Alexander Cartwright. Doubleday enjoyed an illustrious military career, and was awarded a patent for the San Francisco-style trolley, but his role as a baseball innovator is utterly unfounded.

Cartwright’s role in the codification of numerous elements of the game is, however, fully documented in the Knickerbocker rules, which were first printed in Cooperstown in 1845, and named after the Knickerbocker Base Read the rest of this entry »

If Abner Doubleday Didn’t Invent Baseball, Who Did?

April 29th, 2013 by admin

Although the debate continues as to who invented the game of baseball, more sports analysts and baseball historians are leaning towards the evidence presented in the case of Alexander Cartwright. Dating back to the mid-nineteenth century (circa 1848), Cartwright drafted a copy of the Knickerbocker Rules, some of which still apply in the modern era. He’s also known to be the first person to come up with the baseball diamond structure, as well as establishing the 90 foot distances between each of the four bases. Even though Abner Doubleday made contributions Read the rest of this entry »

Did Abner Doubleday Really Invent Baseball?

April 27th, 2013 by admin

Abner Doubleday’s name will always be associated with America’s favorite pastime, yet the idea that he invented baseball is becoming more of a myth than anything else. Debunking the myth required a little research into the Mills Commission and its chairman, Abraham G Mills. In 1905 a group of his colleagues appointed Mills to find out who invented the game; during that same period, a 71 year-old man by the name of Abner Graves published an article entitled, Abner Doubleday Invented Read the rest of this entry »